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Information for

Students Assigned a Report on Albinism

We’re delighted you’re doing a report on albinism, one of the most interesting, yet often misunderstood, genetic phenomena. The majority of the materials NOAH publishes about albinism are on this web site. Feel free to print and circulate any material. We ask, however, that you leave the material in tact with the appropriate copyright information.


What is albinism?
Where can I find facts about albinism?
What do people with albinism look like?
What is it like to have albinism?
Where can I find hard-core scientific information about albinism?
Who discovered albinism?
What is the chromosomal location for genes associated with albinism?
What other websites discuss albinism?
I Read EVERYTHING here and I still have questions about albinism. How can I contact NOAH?


What is albinism?

Albinism is a group of genetic conditions that causes a lack of pigment. It can effect only the eyes (ocular albinism) or both the eyes and skin (oculocutaneous albinism). Most types of albinism are inherited when an individual receives the albinism gene from both parents. The exception is one type of ocular albinism, which is passed on from mothers to their sons.

For more information on the genetics of albinism, see the NOAH Information Bulletin What is Albinism
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Where can I find facts about albinism?
See NOAH’s information Bulletins
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What do people with albinism look like?
While most people with albinism have very light skin and hair, not all do. In less pigmented types of oculocutaneous albinism, (the type of albinism that affects both the skin and the eyes), hair and skin are cream-colored. In types with slight pigmentation, hair appears more yellow or red-tinged People with ocular albinism (albinism that only affects the eyes) usually have normal or only slightly lighter than normal physical appearance. A common myth is that by definition people with albinism have red eyes. In fact there are different types of albinism, and the amount of pigment in the eyes varies. Most individuals with albinism have blue eyes. Some have hazel or brown eyes. See NOAH’s Information Bulletin What is Albinism for more information about how albinism affects a person’s appearance You can see pictures of people with albinism at Positive Exposure, a photo project dedicated to celebrating the beauty of people with albinism.
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What is it like to have albinism?
Visit the Albinism Online Community. You’ll find several forums where people share experiences and ask questions. Among the forums are specific forums for Teens with Albinism, Adults with Albinism, and People of Color with albinism. You can gain a lot of insight on what it is like to live with albinism just by reading some of the posts. Please read before you post..
One NOAH publications is NOT available on this site also discuss what life is like for people with albinism. Albinism, the People the Challenge is a video. NOAH offers for a nominal fee. Call NOAH toll-free at 1-800-473-2310, or email NOAH, to order a copy. Once you have completed your research, why not donate the video to your local library so others may learn about albinism?
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Where can I find hard-core scientific information about albinism?
Visit the International Albinism Center Web Site at http://albinism.med.umn.edu/
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Who discovered albinism?
We consulted the experts and this was the answer we received."I believe that albinism has been in "literature" since the beginning of medical literature. There have been several Greek and Roman authors (Plinius Secundus the elder and Aulus Gellius for example) that have described albinism in man. I do not believe that anybody discovered albinism. Tyrosinase deficiency in animals was first demonstrated in 1904. The first accurate scientific paper written about albinism was by Sir Archibald Garrod in 1908."
- William S. Oetting, Ph.D.
Department of Medicine - Genetics
University of Minnesota
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What is the chromosomal location for genes associated with albinism?
For the most current information please see http://albinismdb.med.umn.edu/

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What other websites discuss albinism?
Please see our Related Links section


I Read EVERYTHING here and I still have questions about albinism. How can I contact NOAH?
E-mail NOAH or call NOAH toll-free at 1-800-473-2310.

 

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NOAH
The National Organization for Albinism and Hypopigmentation
PO Box 959, East Hampstead, NH 03826-0959
Phone: 800 473-2310 (US and Canada) Phone: 603 887-2310 Fax: 800-648-2310
http://www.albinism.org

If you have any questions or comments, please e-mail us at webmaster@albinism.org

NOAH is a volunteer organization for persons and families involved with the condition of albinism. It does not diagnose, treat, or provide genetic counseling. It is involved in self-help, while trying to promote research and education.

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